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Soft Foot Checks and Corrections

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LUDECA, Inc. has released the first video of a series of Crash Course Videos titled “Soft Foot Checks and Corrections”.

According to Alan Luedeking, Manager Tech Support, “Soft foot is every alignment technician’s worst nightmare and while correcting soft foot may not be easy, it is worth every minute you spend on it, because once done, the alignment of the machines becomes a much easier task. If you want to make aligning your machinery easier, quicker and more accurate, start by correcting soft foot.”

The Soft Foot video is available on LUDECA’s YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/LUDECAINC) and provides insights and instructions on solving various types of soft foot, and demonstrates industry-leading techniques using laser alignment equipment. Additional video courses are planned and will be available soon.

LUDECA pioneered laser shaft alignment technology in the U.S. market with the introduction of its legendary OPTALIGN system, manufactured by PRUFTECHNIK in 1984 and has since trained thousands on Machinery Alignment best practices as well as Soft Foot and Thermal Growth. With the release of their first crash course video, LUDECA hopes to help by sharing its expertise in the field of shaft alignment.

Watch VIDEO Soft Foot Checks and Corrections: http://bit.ly/Xd2INv

About LUDECA 

LUDECA is a leading provider of Preventive, Predictive and Corrective Maintenance Solutions including machinery laser alignment, vibration analysis and balancing equipment as well as software, rentals, services and training. For more information, visit www.ludeca.com

2 COMMENTS

  1. Hello and Merry Christmas,

    What is the difference between soft foot and flat foot while aligning a pump motor system or individual components eg pump and motor ?

    cheers

    Paul

  2. “Soft foot” means machine frame distortion. Any condition that causes a machine casing to warp or distort as you tighten the anchor bolts is a soft foot. This could be from something as simple as missing shims under a foot (a short foot) to something as complex as pipe strain (an ‘induced’ soft foot from external forces acting on the machine frame.)

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